In this world of instant gratification, where it is all about getting followers today and RTs on our content, the concept of needing to make it through the first 6 to 18 months is a bit foreign to the modern blogger. This year I just launched a new blog and even with years of blogging experience I find myself pulling my hair out watching the slow trickle that is my new blog's traffic. Luckily I know (and get reminded by fantastic articles such as yours) that if I stick at it I will break the barrier eventually.
Choose content that will last for a while. This can be difficult depending on the style of your blog, but if you focus on writing articles that aren’t ‘trendy’, you’ll likely have many more readers in the long run. If you’re writing about a fad, insert it into an article that will likely stay popular for more than a few months. In this way, you can almost guarantee future readership, especially if your page gets plenty of hits to start. Writing about things that are popular in the moment may give you a short burst of readers, but after a few weeks the number will likely dwindle significantly.
To do that, you need a consolidated view of customer preferences and expectations across all channels – web, social media, mobile, direct mail, point of sale, etc. Retailers do this using omnichannel retail analytics. Marketers can use this information to create and anticipate consistent, coordinated customer experiences that will move customers along in the buying cycle. The deeper your customer insight into behavior and preferences, the more likely you are to engage them in lucrative interactions.
Data-driven advertising: Users generate a lot of data in every step they take on the path of customer journey and brands can now use that data to activate their known audience with data-driven programmatic media buying. Without exposing customers' privacy, users' data can be collected from digital channels (e.g.: when customer visits a website, reads an e-mail, or launches and interact with brand's mobile app), brands can also collect data from real world customer interactions, such as brick and mortar stores visits and from CRM and sales engines datasets. Also known as people-based marketing or addressable media, data-driven advertising is empowering brands to find their loyal customers in their audience and deliver in real time a much more personal communication, highly relevant to each customers' moment and actions.[44]
Take the email below from Paperless Post, for example. I love the header of this email: It provides a clear CTA that includes a sense of urgency. Then, the subheader asks a question that forces recipients to think to themselves, "Wait, when is Mother's Day again? Did I buy Mom a card?" Below this copy, the simple grid design is both easy to scan and quite visually appealing. Each card picture is a CTA in and of itself -- click on any one of them, and you'll be taken to a purchase page.
21 steps are crucial and all points are need to execute for getting the better performance for our blogs. I like the bonus point and it is crtical for sure because at the intial level some bloggers are might be frustrated and they give up but as Rand says if you steady & focusing on your blogs then definitely no one can stops you. I just learning so much from this Mozers community and thanks for the lovely post Rand...:)
The biggest issues I have run into at MyBlogGuest have been articles not getting published at all, or being greatly altered by an unscrupulous publisher. It's a real headache to have 10-15 bids on an article, accept one, and then wait 1-2 weeks only to find that the publisher never followed through. Then you have to start over and begin accepting bids again.

I think you have created a great example today on how to increase not only new, but return blog traffic. Revisiting and updating outdated content and republishing it is a great way to get existing users to come back to your site. I wasnt around Moz in 2007 when the first version of this post was published. If I was and remembered that content It would have been one more reason for me to check this post out.


Comment on other blogs and be active in various communities. Consider interviewing major industry loggers or including other bloggers in a “best of” post (for example, Top 10 Blogs Rocking Pinterest). Once you have a blogger cited or featured in one of your posts, tag them in a tweet to let them know. Chances are that blogger will retweet and share a post mentioning them, getting more shares and more traffic as a result.


Pick a topic to write about that really interests you. It can take a long time for a blog to develop strong regular traffic, so you'll want to pick a subject that you'll be happy to write about even when you aren't getting a lot of feedback. While selecting a popular search term as the basis for your blog can get you a lot of hits initially, traffic will quickly drop off if you don't know your subject and you'll be stuck with a blog with little to no traffic that you aren't interested in writing.
The web was not made for static, text-only content! Readers appreciate links, as do other bloggers, site owners and even search engines. When you reference your own material in-context and in a way that's not manipulative (watch out for over-optimizing by linking to a category, post or page every time a phrase is used - this is almost certainly discounted by search engines and looks terrible to those who want to read your posts), you potentially draw visitors to your other content AND give search engines a nice signal about those previous posts.
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