Organize your content. If you have a great design and content, you have to be sure to have great organization to match. If readers can’t find what they’re looking for easily, they’ll be much less likely to visit again in the future or to recommend your blog to others. Create a navigation bar at the top of the page or in a column, with links to common articles. Furthermore, set up a ‘tag’ system in which you can tag articles with keywords or phrases that will make it easier for readers to search.


You provide some really great, detailed information here. We agree that sharing your posts are one of the best ways to make connections. Its also one of the best ways of getting your voice out there. Within small businesses especially, the use of sharing infromation is useful. All the aspects you have covered is essential information for any business in general. Thanks for posting this!
Avoid overwhelming your readers. When you’re full of inspiration or you have a lot to say, it can be easy to create blog posts, designs, images, and content that are overwhelming to viewers. Try to keep each individual post relatively short, breaking up broad topics into multiple, concise articles. Additionally, avoid having tons of contrasting ads, images, and links spread around the borders of your page.
On my way to post this comment, I encountered way down a very long, long line of commenters, people who have expressed reactions about this blog. I said to myself these people have same or similar concern with me. But 2 issues almost prevented me from taking advantage of this article, first; the comments were most dated 4 or 3 years ago and the least was 2 years ago, second; I was made to register and verify my email. I pause for a golden second and finally decided to avail the substance of this blog, hoping I can derive some pinches of benefits to invite people to visit my blogs. Good day to everyone and to those who came and posted ahead of me.
Focus on your design. The first thing people notice when they visit your blog, is the way it looks. And although the old adage goes that one shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, the same isn’t always true for a blog. If you want people to stay on your blog, you’ve got to hook them with an eye-catching design; once they’re interested in the appearance, they’ll start reading to see what you’re all about.

Don't be discouraged if you ask and get a "no" or a "no response." As your profile grows in your niche, you'll have more opportunities, requests and an easier time getting a "yes," so don't take early rejections too hard and watch out - in many marketing practices, persistence pays, but pestering a blogger to write for them is not one of these (and may get your email address permanently banned from their inbox).
Likewise, when requesting a contribution, especially from someone with a significant industry profile, asking for a very specific piece of writing is much easier than getting them to write an entire piece from scratch of their own design. You should also present statistics that highlight the value of posting on your site - traffic data, social followers, RSS subscribers, etc. can all be very persuasie to a skeptical writer.
Choose a catchy and descriptive title. The title of your blog is one of the first things that readers will see and one of the factors that search engines use to determine what your blog is about. The title of your blog should let readers know right away what your blog is about. It should be easy to remember, not too long, and not too similar to another website's name.
When pitching your guest post make it as easy as possible for the other party. When requesting to post, have a phenomenal piece of writing all set to publish that's never been shared before and give them the ability to read it. These requests get far more "yes" replies than asking for the chance to write with no evidence of what you'll contribute. At the very least, make an outline and write a title + snippet.
Marketing emails need to be personalized to the reader and filled with interesting graphics. Few people want to read emails that are addressed "Dear Sir/Madam" -- as opposed to their first or last name -- and even fewer people want to read an email that simply gives them a wall of text. Visuals help your recipients quickly understand what the point of the email is.
Don't be discouraged if you ask and get a "no" or a "no response." As your profile grows in your niche, you'll have more opportunities, requests and an easier time getting a "yes," so don't take early rejections too hard and watch out - in many marketing practices, persistence pays, but pestering a blogger to write for them is not one of these (and may get your email address permanently banned from their inbox).
When pitching your guest post make it as easy as possible for the other party. When requesting to post, have a phenomenal piece of writing all set to publish that's never been shared before and give them the ability to read it. These requests get far more "yes" replies than asking for the chance to write with no evidence of what you'll contribute. At the very least, make an outline and write a title + snippet.
Avoid overwhelming your readers. When you’re full of inspiration or you have a lot to say, it can be easy to create blog posts, designs, images, and content that are overwhelming to viewers. Try to keep each individual post relatively short, breaking up broad topics into multiple, concise articles. Additionally, avoid having tons of contrasting ads, images, and links spread around the borders of your page.
To engage customers retailers have shifted from the linear marketing approach of one-way communication to a value exchange model of mutual dialogue and benefit-sharing between provider and consumer.[26] Exchanges are more non-linear, free flowing, and both one-to-many or one-on-one.[6] The spread of information and awareness can occur across numerous channels, such as the blogosphere, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Pinterest, and a variety of other platforms. Online communities and social networks allow individuals to easily create content and publicly publish their opinions, experiences, and thoughts and feelings about many topics and products, hyper-accelerating the diffusion of information.[27]
Likewise, when requesting a contribution, especially from someone with a significant industry profile, asking for a very specific piece of writing is much easier than getting them to write an entire piece from scratch of their own design. You should also present statistics that highlight the value of posting on your site - traffic data, social followers, RSS subscribers, etc. can all be very persuasie to a skeptical writer.
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