I think you have created a great example today on how to increase not only new, but return blog traffic. Revisiting and updating outdated content and republishing it is a great way to get existing users to come back to your site. I wasnt around Moz in 2007 when the first version of this post was published. If I was and remembered that content It would have been one more reason for me to check this post out.
Much of the spam email we all get proclaiming "deals" is a good example of email marketing at its worst. Someone somewhere buys an email list (or several) and sends an email along the lines of “Get ___________ (the product name) for only $_____! (the amount)" to everyone on the list—sometimes repeatedly. All this does is annoy everyone and give email marketing a bad name.
As bloggers, we see a lot of comments. Many are spam, only a few add real value, and even fewer are truly fascinating and remarkable. If you can be in this final category consistently, in ways that make a blogger sit up and think "man, I wish that person commented here more often!" you can achieve great things for your own site's visibility through participation in the comments of other blogs.

Search engine marketing - Search engine marketing (SEM) is a form of Internet marketing that involves the promotion of websites by increasing their visibility in search engine results pages (SERPs) primarily through paid advertising. SEM may incorporate Search engine optimization, which adjusts or rewrites website content and site architecture to achieve a higher ranking in search engine results pages to enhance pay per click (PPC) listings.


Participate in other blog communities. If you’re an avid reader of other blogs in your genre, you’ve probably noticed that people will comment with links to their own blogs at the end of popular posts. Commenting alone is a great way to get your name and ideas out in the world, but if you’re able to add a link to your blog as well, you’ll likely grab a few attentive readers. This is good, because the people who click through to your blog are likely some of the most loyal, possibly gaining you a solid following.
Make sure your content is worth sharing and that you're actually phrasing it in terms that are useful for their followers/fans. (otherwise you're goign to come off ungeniune and spammy) In all fairness to, you'd want to develop relationships with the most influential rainmakers, ask them up front if there is anything you can do to help them out. Most of the time just asking is enough to impress them and develop a good rapport.
With offline marketing, it's very difficult to tell how people are interacting with your brand before they have an interaction with a salesperson or make a purchase. With digital marketing, you can identify trends and patterns in people's behavior before they've reached the final stage in their buyer's journey, meaning you can make more informed decisions about how to attract them to your website right at the top of the marketing funnel.

In this world of instant gratification, where it is all about getting followers today and RTs on our content, the concept of needing to make it through the first 6 to 18 months is a bit foreign to the modern blogger. This year I just launched a new blog and even with years of blogging experience I find myself pulling my hair out watching the slow trickle that is my new blog's traffic. Luckily I know (and get reminded by fantastic articles such as yours) that if I stick at it I will break the barrier eventually.

Great post Moz. I really enjoyed reading your 21 tips and the 22nd is the one that really hit home. You are right about the importance of consistency. Blogs, like any other business or venture, take time to get going. I've had my ups and downs with my blog but am in it for the long haul. So thanks for reminding us to be persistant! The first 21 tips did have a lot of good information and I will continue to work on those techniques as well. Best of luck!
21 steps are crucial and all points are need to execute for getting the better performance for our blogs. I like the bonus point and it is crtical for sure because at the intial level some bloggers are might be frustrated and they give up but as Rand says if you steady & focusing on your blogs then definitely no one can stops you. I just learning so much from this Mozers community and thanks for the lovely post Rand...:)
YouTube has become the second most popular search engine and a lot of users are turning to YouTube before they make a buying decision, to learn something, read a review, or just to relax. There are several video marketing platforms, including Facebook Videos, Instagram, or even TikTok to use to run a video marketing campaign. Companies find the most success with video by integrating it with SEO, content marketing, and broader social media marketing campaigns.
NOTE: This post replaces a popular one I wrote on the same topic in 2007 (and updated again in 2012). This post is intended to be useful to all forms of bloggers - independent folks, those seeking to monetize, and marketing professionals working an in-house blog from tiny startups to huge companies. Not all of the tactics will work for everyone, but at least some of these should be applicable and useful.
Just like #9 and #13. There is a site called BeaconWatch: http://www.beaconwatch.com/ Here you can submit answers to questions that no one has asked. That means you can provide solutions to problems of your choice, so you can write about really anything and if people like your content they will follow to your blog which is shown along with your answers

Connecting the dots between marketing and sales is hugely important -- according to Aberdeen Group, companies with strong sales and marketing alignment achieve a 20% annual growth rate, compared to a 4% decline in revenue for companies with poor alignment. If you can improve your customer's' journey through the buying cycle by using digital technologies, then it's likely to reflect positively on your business's bottom line.
With the explosion of digital media, people began to engage with each other – and the companies they did business with – in new ways. The relevance of traditional print and broadcast channels declined, completely changing the consumer-corporation dynamic. Digital channels opened doors for consumers. No longer passive participants in a one-sided marketing conversation, consumers became empowered authors, publishers and critics. The digital landscape is participatory, an area where consumers exchange ideas. Marketers no longer drive the discussion. Everyday consumers are now the style makers and trendsetters.
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